Starring Sarah Palin as Alice…

While I’m ranting about political topics, let me blow off a little steam about the Tea Partiers. I’m not sure how Louis Carroll would feel about seeing a significant element in American politics modeled after Messrs Hatter and Hare, but I rather doubt it would be pride.

The Tea Partiers are the intellectual bastard children of Karl Rove and Rupert Murdock (and similar manipulators of public opinion). Bred from the innuendo and suspicion fostered by conservative political strategy, they have grown up unable to trust any authority, even the ones that created them.

The plan was that by using slander and demagoguery, conservatives could control what people believed and how they would vote. It even worked, for a while. But much to their current surprise and dismay, it’s turning out that the victories they’ve bought with their dishonest tactics are victories they’ve charged to a very expensive credit card. And it’s time to pay the bills.

The trouble with rabble-rousing is that you end up with a lot of roused rabble. And in this case it’s a lot of roused rabble with an inherent mistrust of authority. Is it a coincidence that they’re developing a taste for candidates like Sarah Palin and George Bush, whose popularity is based on their lack of “elite” leadership skills? If you don’t trust your leaders, why not put the incompetents in that position, so they’ll be less of a threat, eh?

It will be interesting to see how this plays out. There’s no cure short of waiting for the Tea Partiers to realize that denying reality is mostly self-destructive. The question is, can the RNC survive the monster they worked so hard to create?

 
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Posted in Current Events, Politics, Science. 9 Comments »

9 Responses to “Starring Sarah Palin as Alice…”

  1. David D.G. Says:

    “The trouble with rabble-rousing is that you end up with a lot of roused rabble.”

    That’s one of the wisest political comments I’ve ever read.

    The problem is that very few of the rabble-rousers have either the ability or the inclination to comprehend why this is a bad thing. The Terrors of the French Revolution, anyone?

    ~David D.G.

  2. Chigliakus Says:

    The question is, can the RNC survive the monster they worked so hard to create?

    I hope the answer is ‘no’, but I fear the answer is actually ‘yes.’ We will get to see whether the extremism in the party drives moderates and independents to the Dems later this year. I am cautiously optimistic.

  3. Modusoperandi Says:

    “It will be interesting to see how this plays out.”
    It’s like the Clinton era, but worse. This time, it’s a brown Democrat.

    “There’s no cure short of waiting for the Tea Partiers to realize that denying reality is mostly self-destructive.”
    Never happen. “They” have closed the loop (it’s Creationism writ as political ideology). Their own stars, their own media, etc. Anything that conflicts with groupthink by definition must be wrong and must be written off (or reimagined) to conform to the Truth™.

    “The question is, can the RNC survive the monster they worked so hard to create?”
    Yes. Whether the GOP becomes the Teaparty or the Teabaggers vote for their own candidates or for a steadily-rightward moving GOP, the conservative bedrocks will be maintained. The economic cons will still get their tax cuts and deregulation and the social cons will get to continue treating unpopular minorities like shit. Will this continued shift to the right marginalize them? Probably, but in a two Party system (particularly one that includes the Democrats, who seem predisposed to grab defeat from the jaws of victory) there’s nobody else to vote for when the majority Party gets corrupt or lazy.
    Remember, too, that between 18-33% of Americans are out of their mind. Add in, say, a crashing economy, two wars, an oil spill and scary Mexicans stealin’ yer jerbs, not to mention the everpresent but rarely seen deadly Muslim…as well as a Big Media that views news as the thing that fills time between commercials, as well as the ADD addled memory of too many people and you’ve got a recipe for the [Nutty] Right coming back to power (I mean, they aren’t in power now and yet they’re still setting the national dialogue, keeping the Dems on the defense…).
    In addition, every step they go to the Right has the Dems follow them, moving the Overton Window over another notch and resetting the old Right as the new Left. The Right, even when they disagree, keep moving in the same direction (Teabaggers: “We don’t want our tax money going to help ‘them'”, GOP: “We don’t want our tax money going to help people lower than us on the ladder”. TB: “We don’t want to cut the military”, GOP: “We don’t want to cut the military”, etc). The Left, by contrast, can’t move in the same direction even if they do agree.
    Long story short, eventually the White House will again be occupied by an (R) instead of a (D).
    Then the Right of the Right will settle down until the next time a Democrat has the indecency to win the Big Seat.

    Note that this is all from the point of view of a foreigner. We think you’re all nuts, by the way.

  4. pboyfloyd Says:

    Ain’t Sarah Palin the Red Queen?

  5. mikespeir Says:

    Wow, Modus, you went on quite a tear, didn’t you. You should be a preacher.

    BTW, I resent this very much: “We think you’re all nuts.” At least I really, really wish it wasn’t true. ;-)

  6. pevo Says:

    Its not like the gop is some normally honest group who accidentally messed up by going to far with the rhetoric this time. This is what they have been since at least Regan and it has worked well for them. Whats different now, if anything, is that information flows much more freely. It remains to be seen if that will sway and hold independents.

    I mean, we keep looking at the gop and going ‘ah ha! i got you now! you clearly demonstrate a logical inconsistency here, and hypocrisy here’ as if their supporters were critical thinkers. But their supporters simply do not evaluate them on that basis.

  7. Deacon Duncan Says:

    I wasn’t really paying much attention until the 70’s, but it seems to me that before the Moral Majority the GOP was a significantly different party. But Falwell and Robertson and Dobson and friends all sold the evangelical Christian church to the Republicans in exchange for a measly few million dollars worth of fame and influence, and ever since then it’s been history repeating itself. In 2,000 years of trying, the marriage of church and state has never once failed to corrupt and weaken both.

  8. Modusoperandi Says:

    Mikespeir “Wow, Modus, you went on quite a tear, didn’t you. You should be a preacher.”
    It’s all that pent up energy. I’m a mime.

    “BTW, I resent this very much: ‘We think you’re all nuts.’ At least I really, really wish it wasn’t true. “
    Granted, your “left left” is ignored, but your “left” is, in the very least, our “centre-right” and your “right” is our “right out-to-lunch”. Your “right right” here, instead of running a Party, would be locked up as a danger to themselves and others.

    pevo “But their supporters simply do not evaluate them on that basis.”
    It’s tribal, resulting in odd forms of the Argument from Authority (where everything “their” tribe says is taken as truth) and the Genetic Fallacy (where everything the other tribe says is automatically false).

    Deacon Duncan “I wasn’t really paying much attention until the 70’s, but it seems to me that before the Moral Majority the GOP was a significantly different party.”
    I was too young (and too foreign) to care then (and we had guys like Trudeau and, *shudder*, Mulroney to worry about), but the GOP used to be mostly pragmatic Mods (with a smattering of plutocrats)*. The rise of the Christian Right slowly pushed out the Mods, replacing them with social conservatives, leaving a Party that cares more about what you do with your crotch than, say, everything else. They might be kooks, but they’re patient (and they seem to view “winning” as the same thing as “being right”, sacrificing morality for ideology and reality for fantasy). Worse, as the present shows, when they fail that just tells them that they weren’t doing it hard enough.

    * …making the Democrats now what the Republicans were then

  9. Hunt Says:

    I view the Tea Party movement as pretty much separate from GOP, whose leaders are now struggling to harness whatever help it may be in the midterms, and neutralize whatever hazards it may pose. Since the TP has its origins in Ron Paul’s campaign and has a distinct libertarian agenda, with a certain amount of US imperialism and xenophobia mixed in, it’s a new-old spin on conservatism. You might call them the neo-neocons, or the post-neocons. Neocons were still big-government, while TPers are definitely not. The GOP nightmare scenario is that libertarian candidates will take the field in primaries, to be found repulsive by the general constituency when the truth of their platforms are revealed. Rand Paul’s incendiary gaffe is recent evidence that they’re walking a very thin line. Even conservatives are not terribly eager to relinquish the gains made since the New Deal and Civil Rights Act. Being primarily based on economic dissatisfaction, the TP is inherently unstable; it can gain or lose in momentum depending on how the general status of the country progresses. Extreme elements are ALWAYS lurking in the shadows, waiting for an opportunity….