Christians ponder how to respond to atheistic “evangelism”

The Christian Post has an interesting article about

S. Michael Craven, president of the Center for Christ & Culture, wonders if it is the actions of Christians that are causing nonbelievers and seekers to doubt the existence of God…

“Has Christianity become so politically defined that true faith and the person of Jesus Christ is obscured in the minds of many?” he asks in his latest weekly commentary. “Is it possible that Christians are conducting themselves in such a way that the spiritually seeking are looking anywhere but to Christ?”

No, the problem is that Christ is conducting Himself in such a way as to not show up in the real world. If Jesus would only behave as though he believed what men say about him in the Gospel, there wouldn’t be any need for Christians to engage in any mental self-flagellation over their failure to live lives good enough to make people think Jesus exists. The reason more people don’t turn to Christ is because he does not show up for anyone to turn to. And those that do “turn to Christ” are really only turning to Christians (i.e. the people who really do exist), which is why Christians worry about tweaking their marketing campaign whenever faith starts to wane.

It’s fascinating how clearly Christians can see the link between their own behavior and people’s faith in Christ, without ever acknowledging, even to themselves, that they are manufacturing this “faith” out of their own efforts. But at least Craven seems to realize, at some level, that the Church is now beginning to pay the consequences of having sold itself to the Republican National Committee.

 
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Posted in Current Events, Unapologetics. 3 Comments »

3 Responses to “Christians ponder how to respond to atheistic “evangelism””

  1. PalMD Says:

    They will never admit that the lack of the appearance of God/Christ is significant or true. They will explain how they feel his presence and see his works, yada, yada.

    When they shake his hand and kiss his cheek (oops), call me.

  2. The Professor Says:

    You’re right, they can’t admit that God fails to show up in the real world. And yet they can’t deny it, either, because it’s universally true. God appears only as a character in the stories, superstitions and subjective feelings and fantasies of men. You can give Him credit for the things you see in real life (superstition), and you can imagine Him speaking to you in your heart (autosuggestion), but He can never behave in any way that exceeds what an imaginary friend could do.

    What makes it even tougher is that, in God’s absence, men have no choice but to put their faith in the stories, superstitions, and subjective feelings of other fallible men (and in themselves). You can’t believe what God says because God does not show up to say anything. Faith in God is not an available option.

    Together, these two facts make up the Unavoidable Fact (of God’s absence) and the Inescapable Consequence (Christian faith is in man, not in God). Christianity cannot face these two things together. We might not be able to convince the Christians, but it’s no fun for them to be confronted with the reality of God’s absence and its implications. If they are confronted with this often enough, they at least may come to see the wisdom of keeping their religious opinions to themselves.

  3. PalMD Says:

    “…faith is in Man…”

    Vanity, vanity, all is vanity…